3 Bluetooth keyboards for Android tablets

By , Computerworld |  Networking, Android, bluetooth

The Logitech Tablet Keyboard has five rows; the number keys at the top double as Android function keys when used in conjunction with a function (Fn) button. Those Android keys allow you to open your tablet's browser, music player, calendar, or Gmail app, as well as remotely control music playback and volume on the tablet. These are handy, but I would have liked it better if they had been dedicated rather than combination keys. The keyboard does have dedicated Search, Back, Home and Menu keys.

Have an iPad?

If you want a wireless keyboard for your iPad, try "Hands-on: 5 wireless keyboards for the iPad."

Though all of the keyboards I tested offer Delete keys, the Logitech keyboard is the only one on which the key actually functions as you would expect: It deletes the letter that comes immediately after the cursor. For some reason, every other keyboard's Delete key either did nothing or served as a second Backspace key, deleting letters before the cursor instead of after it.

In terms of accuracy, the Logitech keyboard's performance was outstanding, and I encountered few errors in prolonged use. When typing extremely fast, I did experience some sporadic issues in which certain letters would appear multiple times, or certain letters would be omitted even though I'd pressed them. This occurred rarely, however, and seems to be a common occurrence among Bluetooth keyboards.

Logitech Tablet Keyboard for Android 3.0+ from Logitech

Price: $69.99 (direct); $54 - $92 (retail)

Dimensions: 5.6 x 1.2 x 12.3 in.

Weight: 1.6 lb.

Powered by: 4 AAA batteries

Pros: Spacious and responsive typing surface; integrated Android command keys; includes protective case and tablet stand

Cons: Most Android command keys aren't dedicated; occasional errors when typing quickly

Motorola Wireless Keyboard

Motorola's Wireless Keyboard is a great option for any Android tablet owner. The keyboard stands out from the pack with its sleek design -- the lettering used on the keys has a futuristic, Android-like look -- as well as with its large, well-spaced keys.

As a result of the size and spread of its keys, Motorola's unit is slightly larger than the other keyboards I tested -- just under half an inch longer and half an inch taller than the Logitech product. The difference certainly isn't enormous, but it might be relevant if you're concerned about portability.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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