10 tech research projects to watch

Researchers are dreaming the tools, technology, and products that will make up the everyday life of tomorrow

By Ian Paul, PC World |  Hardware, future tech

Intel in September was showing off a low-power processor that is efficient enough to run a PC powered by a solar cell the size of a postage stamp.

Codenamed Claremont, the chip is only an experimental CPU and Intel currently has no plans to release it as a commercial project. The company may adapt some of Claremont's technology for future products as part of Intel's goal to reduce by fivefold the power consumption of current processors.

Super HD

Sharp and Japanese broadcaster NHK are working on a high-definition resolution display called Super Hi-Vision that is 16 times the resolution of current full HD 1080p (1920 by 1080) panels.

SHV resolution is 7820-by-4320 and each frame of film is equal to a 33-megapixel image. Sharp in May produced an 85-inch Super Hi-Vision LCD display to demonstrate the technology. Super Hi-Vision is set to begin limited trials in Japan in 2020.

Robo Dog

Massachusetts-based Boston Dynamics is helping DARPA and the U.S. Marine Corps develop an all-terrain robot dog that can help soldiers carry heavy loads in remote locations such as the mountains of Afghanistan.

The goal is for the company's LS3-Legged Squad Support Systems project to produce a robot that can carry up to 400 pounds across 20 miles or more of rough terrain. It will also be powered by an internal combustion engine with enough power to last 24 hours.  The company's current prototype, AlphaDog, can regain its balance should it fall or be knocked over. The end product won't require remote control and will be able to use computer sensors and GPS to follow a leader. AlphaDog can't walk without help yet, but Boston Dynamic plans to produce the first independent version of the robot in 2012.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul) on Twitter and Google+, and with Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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