tuCloud criticizes Microsoft, OnLive for virtual desktop licensing debacle

By Colin Neagle, Network World |  Virtualization, desktop virtualization, tuCloud

"Thank you, OnLive, for creating media attention for 1,500+ CSPs that were doing cloud desktops before you, better than you, and in compliance with the rules," Hsu wrote in a Citrix blog post. "Thank you for raising enough controversy to get Microsoft to reaffirm that you're doing the licensing wrong, and our CSPs are doing it right. Thank you."

Danny Allan, CTO of Desktone, tuCloud's partner in Desktops On Demand, reiterated the benefits of OnLive's licensing situation for raising awareness of not only the growing demand for virtual desktop solutions, but also the challenges of licensing virtual products.

Awareness of Microsoft's complex licensing structure is important because it has impacted the market as a whole, Allan says. Microsoft licensing challenges have long driven up the cost for virtual desktop services, while also slowing down development for providers looking to release a new service without ending up in the same position as OnLive, Allan says.

Bule, while touting tuCloud's Desktops On Demand, made sure to help raise awareness of these challenges as well.

"OnLive blatantly flouts the rules, continues to sell their cloud-hosted Windows 7 desktops, and all Joe Matz does is write a deeply patronizing and insulting blog post. This is slap round the face of the entire desktop virtualization industry," Bule says. "We will no longer sit idle and stay silent whilst being denied the chance to compete fairly. Microsoft licensing hurts our customers, our businesses and the entire virtual desktop space."

Allan, who says the market for cloud-hosted virtual desktop tools reached a turning point in the last nine months as a result for growing demand for mobility, believes Microsoft's licensing standards should adapt accordingly. Until that happens, however, the industry will need to play by Microsoft's rules.

"With the demand increase and the acceleration of that moving forward, should the licensing change? The answer to that in my mind is 'absolutely yes,'" Allan says. "But that's for Microsoft to change, not for tuCloud to ignore."

Colin Neagle covers Microsoft security and network management for Network World. Keep up with his blog: Rated Critical, follow him on Twitter: @ntwrkwrldneagle. Colin's email is cneagle@nww.com.

Read more about data center in Network World's Data Center section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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