Stupid tech support tricks: IT calls of shame

Pronoun problems, IT ghosts, the runaway mouse -- when it comes to computers, the customer isn't always right

By , InfoWorld |  IT Management

"As it was happening, it occurred to me how strange it must seem to others," Fiske says. "He had already said that the deeper voice was better, so there was no going back."

Stupid tech support trick No. 3: The case of the IT ghostAny IT pro will tell you that remote access can be a real lifesaver. But sometimes, taking control of someone's computer from afar can have unintended consequences.

Just ask Russ Long, the IT director of SDS Pharmacy, who was remotely troubleshooting a new point-of-sale system at one of his company's stores on an otherwise ordinary day. He hopped on the phone with the store's manager and signed into the system to see what was up. Long was on the brink of resolving the issue when he encountered another problem he'd never anticipated.

"I heard a scream on the other end of the phone," Long recalls.

Long's first thought was that the store was being robbed. A moment later, though, he discovered it was something far more amusing actually going on.

"The person working the register started yelling that the computer was possessed," Long says.

Apparently, the notion of remote control was new to this associate. Long says it took a good few minutes to calm her down and convince her he wasn't a rogue spirit invading her screen. He admits he had to mute his phone a few times to keep his laughter from being heard.

"Her reaction was just priceless," he says. "I only wish I could have seen her face."

Stupid tech support trick No. 4: The runaway mouseYou work for an IT support group -- specifically, the escalation team that deals only with the toughest of cases. You get a call from a customer who can't get her mouse to click. What do you do? That's the seemingly simple question Ryan Palmertree faced a few years ago.

Palmertree, now a product support manager for Bomgar, was supervising a technician when the call came in. Palmertree and his tech went through all the usual paces and quickly found that the customer's mouse worked fine in every regard except for clicking. Puzzled, Palmertree put on his detective cap and started to listen extra closely.

"I noticed that whenever she tried to click something, I'd hear this faint little plink sound," he explains.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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