The look ahead to a software-controlled world

By John Dix, Network World |  Networking, software defined network

The Interop show in Las Vegas is always a good bellwether for enterprise technology trends, and perhaps the most striking thing about the recent show was how little the term "network fabric" came up.

As Network World blogger Jon Oltsik, a principal analyst at the Enterprise Strategy Group, said in a post, "Everyone was talking about data center fabrics last year -- TRILL, SPB, QFabric, FabricPath, etc. This year however, hardly a word was spoken."

WATCH: Video highlights from Interop 2012

The buzz instead was about software-defined networks, decoupling the network control plane from the data plane and using the OpenFlow protocol to give servers, which inherit network control, access to devices such as switches and routers.

Driving the interest? While virtualization has made it possible to create VMs in minutes, the network changes required can take days because they involve multiple people and multiple tools to update port groups, change virtual router settings, update firewalls, take care of management tools, etc. Offloading that control to servers will simplify and speed the process, making it possible for changes to be propagated across multiple tiers of infrastructure in one fell swoop.

It is still early days, and attendees at the show flocked to educational sessions on SDN and OpenFlow looking to learn more. This isn't to say the network fabric discussion is over; it has just been eclipsed.

One of the other overarching themes at the show, as you would expect, was cloud computing. In fact, SDN and cloud are all part and parcel of the same movement toward software-controlled everything. Many Interop speakers, in fact, were using the term "software-defined data center" as a description of an emerging future state, presumably ultra elastic environments that can morph to meet shifting demands.

He may not be there quite yet, but Zynga CTO of Infrastructure Allan Leinwand used his keynote address to describe his amazingly flexible cloud environment.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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