Apple and EPEAT: What it means

By Dan Moren, Macworld |  Hardware, Apple, EPEAT

Now thats paying attention. EPEAT actually doesnt cover smartphones and tablets at all, meaning none of Apples iOS devices were ever in the product registry in the first place. And a loophole in that above mentioned Executive Order says that government agencies are not required to use EPEAT if there is no EPEAT standard for a particular product.

That means federal agencies have no restrictions on purchasing iOS devices, and given that Apple has been selling more and more iOS devices than Macs, thats another reason why the company may not be as concerned about dropping its products from EPEATs registry. That said, there still could be some blowback from Apples decision to eschew the standard, which could affect the purchase of any of its products.

Does this mean Apple isnt making environmentally-friendly products?

Not really. After all, the products that Apple pulled from the registry havent themselves changedtheyre just as environmentally friendly as they were before. Despite intense scrutiny from organizations like Greenpeace, Apple has remained fairly transparent about its environmental information, listing information on its website about its carbon footprint, use of toxic substances, and recycling initiatives.

Going forward, freedom from EPEATs constraints may mean that Apple can make decisions about its product design that would have been otherwise unfeasiblebut it also means that there may not be an easy, objective way to judge the environmental factors of its future products.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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