Doxie Go a handy document scanner

By R. Matthew Ward, Macworld |  Hardware, scanning

I think it's fair to say that most of us have too much paper in our lives, whether it's business documents, receipts, financial statements, or (my personal weakness) keepsake scraps like menus and ticket stubs. Flatbed scanners are inexpensive, but for large jobs (and, heck, even small ones), the scanning process is tedious.

I'd never considered purchasing a dedicated document scanner, though, until I first heard about the $199 Doxie Go from Apparent. This slick, battery-powered portable document scanner is capable of computer-free scanning, and Apparent's convincing web site filled my head with dreams of reducing paper clutter via a process that would, hopefully, fall somewhere between painless and fun.

Go, Doxie, go

The Doxie Go ("Doxie," incidentally, means "floozy"I'll let you make your own joke) is rectangular glossy white and matte black plastic box that's about 10 inches long, roughly 2 inches square on the side, and weighs just under a pound. Apparent also includes a calibration card, cleaning tool, mini-USB cable, and drawstring carrying bag; a worldwide power adapter is $10, and a carrying case is $29.

A slot on the long side of the scanner accepts paper ranging in size from business cards to 8.5 by 15 inches. To scan, you simply turn the device on and feed it a piece of paper (one piece at a time). The scanner pulls the paper through the slot in about eight seconds, scanning the up-facing side of the page. The Doxie's built-in battery lasts for about 100 scansa reasonable estimate, based on my useand recharges in about an hour via USB cable.

As you scan, Doxie saves the resulting images to its 500MB internal storage, or, optionally, to an SD card or USB drive. The default resolution is 300 dots per inch (dpi); a quick press of the power button switches to 600 dpi, giving more detailed scans, larger files, and a 40 percent reduction in battery life (some desktop scanners have higher resolution, but the Doxie's options should be fine for most uses).


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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