AMD's new SeaMicro server talks to 5-petabyte storage cluster

AMD announced new server and storage products for big data and large-scale cloud applications

By , IDG News Service |  Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices has launched the first new products from its SeaMicro acquisition earlier this year, including a server that can be linked to a massive, 5-petabyte storage cluster for running large-scale big data and cloud computing applications.

The SM15000 server is available now with Intel's "SandyBridge" Xeon processors, AMD announced Monday. Two other models will be released in November: one based on Intel's newer "IvyBridge" processor, and another with AMD's "Piledriver" Opteron processor -- which will be the first SeaMicro server with an AMD chip.

The announcement shows that AMD is willing to keep developing SeaMicro systems using processors from Intel, its chief rival, if it thinks customers will want to buy them. "We're committed to multiple generations of Intel processors," said Andrew Feldman, the former SeaMicro CEO who leads AMD's new data center services division, at a press briefing to announce the new hardware.

Aside from the new processors, the SM15000 appears similar to the other high-density servers SeaMicro was already selling. The Opteron version starts at $139,000 and packs 64 eight-core processors in a 10U chassis, for a total of 512 cores and up to 4TB of main memory, Feldman said.

What's different is that SeaMicro has taken the proprietary network fabric it developed to link the server boards in its existing system, which it calls Freedom Fabric, and extended it outside of the chassis to connect up to 1,408 hard drives in a cluster.

The SM15000 allows for the right balance of compute, storage and network resources required by today's large-scale data centers, Feldman said.

The new server is designed for use by web giants such as Facebook and Google, who are crunching vast amounts of data to analyze customer behavior, and for large enterprises running certain cloud computing workloads. Prime applications include Hadoop and Cassandra, he said.

The new storage architecture offers the functionality of a storage area network but without the cost and complexity, according to Feldman. "What you get is the cost and simplicity of direct-attached storage, and you can create vastly different combinations and ratios of compute to storage," he said.

Nathan Brookwood, principal analyst at Insight64, said the announcement was also interesting because it shows that AMD is willing to keep selling complete server systems even when it means competing with its biggest customers, such as Hewlett-Packard and Dell.

But AMD also hopes to license SeaMicro's fabric technology to other vendors.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question