Brocade guns for 100G Ethernet supremacy

By , Network World |  Data Center, Brocade

Perhaps Brocade's new switches will up that share. The new VDX 8770 chassis switch (pictured above) tops off the VCS-capable VDX switching line from Brocade. It includes 8-slot and 4-slot chassis supporting 4Tbps per slot, Brocade says. The switch was two years in development and was initially expected to ship last year.

At 4Tbps, the 8770 could theoretically support 40 100G Ethernet ports per slot (if physical real estate on a module will allow), or perhaps more than 300 per 8-slot chassis. Brocade would not disclose the 100G densities it is aiming for but said 100G modules for the 8770 will be rolled out in the next 12-18 months.

That capacity could also conceivably support 400 10G and 100 40G ports per slot. But at first ship, the VDX 8770 will support 48-port Gigabit Ethernet, 48-port 10G and 12-port 40G line cards, all at line rate, Brocade says.

The VDX 8770 also features 3.5 microsecond port-to-port latency, and can tunnel VXLAN and NVGRE network virtualization traffic at line rate, the company says. In addition to TRILL support for Layer 2 multipathing, the VDX 8770 also supports Brocade Trunking for Layer 1 resiliency and a technique for Layer 3 multipathing as well.

Each 8770 switch also supports 384,000 MAC addresses and VMs, and provides VXLAN and NVGRE tunnel monitoring for visibility of VMs in software-defined networks, Brocade says.

The company says it has more than 700 VDX switch customers, and that VDX/VCS fabrics can support from 12 to 8,000 ports. The VDX 8770 will ship in the fourth quarter with prices starting at $65,000, and $833 per 10G port. The list price for 40G is $5,000 per port, not including optics.

With the MLX router, Brocade tripled its 10G density with new 24-port modules based on a fourth-generation ASIC. The MLX now supports up to 768 10G ports.

And in keeping with Brocade's software-defined networking strategy, the MLX also now supports OpenFlow 1.0, meaning it can share forwarding information with an OpenFlow controller and then fulfill configuration instructions from that controller through a GUI.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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