VMware CTO: Adapt, enable choice, or die

By Brandon Butler, Network World |  Virtualization, OpenStack, VMware

I think the answer, where this will all end up, is similar to what we saw in server virtualization. I think you'll have a software layer that orchestrates and moves everything, but you'll have a variety of different pieces of hardware that you can plug into it that will add value and functionality on top of it. I don't think there will be a black-and-white, winner-and-loser type race. I think there will be a lot of choices customers will make that will need to fit into some common framework.

NW: So there's room in the market for strategies from multiple vendors?

Herrod: I frankly think there will be one software strategy, or at least one primary one, and we certainly believe we have that in terms of how you manage and orchestrate all of it. But I think there will be a lot of differentiation in how you satisfy that goal, and how you move the bits and value-add around security, load balancing, and all these others areas.

NW: How do you plan to integrate Nicira's technology into VMware products?

Herrod: We actually have a bunch of very large engineering meetings going on to get the precise things we'll be rolling out soon. But the strategy is that we obviously want them to be able to interoperate perfectly. Ultimately we want to be able to do two things. One is to have a management layer with very good scale that allows you to create these overlay networks and allow them to fly across VMware and non-VMware environments. So it certainly embraces heterogeneity. But where I think things really are headed is a large set of higher-level networking services, the Layer 4-7 areas such as security, load balancing and everything else. That's the next horizon that really needs to fit into this new world.

Today you statically place physical appliances on the network and things have to be connected to them. Those are going to get absorbed directly into the software-defined networks. There will be these higher-level network services that also have to follow workloads around, which means they have to be very nimble in how they move and work. So you'll see us do a lot of work taking what we've done with vShield and bringing those same technologies to the non-VMware world and fitting them in with the network.

MORE SDN: Rackspace lets users create virtual networks

NW: What's the time frame for that? And would you roll out the management layer before releasing the higher-level networking features?

Herrod: We're doing them in parallel. They're related but they can be handled in a distinct way. We don't have a time frame yet of when it will be released.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness