U.S. sees tech's 'center of gravity' shifting to Asia

Government's forecast for next 15 to 20 years gives tech a big role; including big data, robotics, smart cities and anarchic social networks

By , Computerworld |  IT Management, robotics

The emerging economies will aided by the spread of multinational corporations as well as by the ability of Chinese, Indian and Brazilian companies to rapidly become competitive internationally.

The speed of this shift depends on the availability of risk capital and the development of laws that protect intellectual property, the report said.

The technology trends that will dominate in the coming years include big data and the tools to manage it. Big data could deliver all kinds of advances, from improving predictive models to providing an oppressive government a new means to control its population.

By 2030, it's possible that quantum computing may begin to have an impact, the report said.

In terms of social networks, the government gives its due to Facebook but says its "continued dominance during the next 15-20 years (or even the next five) is not guaranteed."

Social networks of the future "may not even be formal organizations, but rather anarchic collectives built on sophisticated variants of peer-to-peer file sharing technologies."

Another tech trend is the development of "smart cities," or the ability to use advanced IT capabilities in all aspects of urban management.

Robotics and 3D printing "have the potential to change work patterns in both developing and developed words." They could make technologies could make semi-skilled manufacturing workers in developing economies "redundant."

By 2030, robots "could eliminate the need for human labor entirely in some manufacturing environments with total automation become more cost effective than outsourcing manufacturing to developing economies," according this intelligence report.

This latter point may get an early illustration via Apple as it begins manufacturing one of its Mac lines in the U.S. That plant is expected to be heavily robotic.

Patrick Thibodeau covers SaaS and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @DCgov, or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed . His e-mail address is pthibodeau@computerworld.com.

Read more about emerging technologies in Computerworld's Emerging Technologies Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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