NASA crashes two orbiters into moon mountain

With crash site named after Sally Ride, twin spacecraft Ebb and Flow's lunar mission ends with a bang

By , Computerworld |  Science, NASA

"Sally was all about getting the job done, whether it be in exploring space, inspiring the next generation, or helping make the GRAIL mission the resounding success it is today," said GRAIL principal investigator Maria Zuber of MIT. "As we complete our lunar mission, we are proud we can honor Sally Ride's contributions by naming this corner of the moon after her."

Along with its primary science instrument, each orbiter carried a camera that took more than 115,000 images of the lunar surface. Before the mission began, groups of middle school students voted on what areas of the moon the cameras should target. The images are being sent to those students as part of the planetary studies program.

"Sally Ride worked tirelessly throughout her life to remind all of us, especially girls, to keep questioning and learning," said Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D.-Md). "Today her passion for making students part of NASA's science is honored by naming the impact site for her."

Launched in September 2011, Ebb and Flow had been orbiting the moon since Jan. 1.

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin, on Google+ or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed. Her email address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

See more by Sharon Gaudin on Computerworld.com.

Read more about emerging technologies in Computerworld's Emerging Technologies Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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