AMD shows off Windows 8 tablet with upcoming Tamesh chip

Tablets with AMD's Tamesh chip will become available later this year

By , IDG News Service |  Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices showed off a Windows 8 tablet running the company's upcoming tablet chip code-named Temash, which the company hopes will reverse a string of past failures and provide enough ammunition to compete with tablet chip leaders ARM and Intel.

The prototype tablet made by Wistron has a 10.6-inch screen and plays full 1080p high-definition video. AMD has mostly been repurposing netbook chips for tablets, and the tablet demonstration was intended to showcase the progress made by AMD in making chips exclusively for tablets.

The Temash chip will be targeted at high-performance tablets that can run full HD games and productivity applications, and also have features that will enable long battery life, said Lisa Su, senior vice president at AMD, during a company press conference on Monday at the International CES trade show held in Las Vegas.

Many tablets are mostly content consumption devices that don't provide the capability to run full applications, Su said. Temash will be able to run a full operating system like Windows 8, while drawing less than 5 watts of power and providing long battery life to tablets.

The Temash chip will come in dual-core and quad-core variants. The chip will be 100 percent faster than the existing Z60 tablet chip, which was introduced in October and is currently found in only a handful of devices such as tablets from Fujitsu and Vizio.

The first tablets based on the Temash chips could reach shelves later this year, Su said. However, she could not provide a price for Temash-based tablets.

The Temash chip will be critical for AMD. The company has already failed with its first two tablet chips including last year's Hondo and its Z-01 tablet chip, which was announced in 2011 but failed as it appeared in only a handful of unsuccessful devices.

The fast-growing tablet market is one of AMD's top priorities as it tries to step away from its heavy reliance on the slumping PC market. The lack of a coherent tablet strategy forced former CEO Dirk Meyer to leave the company in 2011. Former Lenovo exec Rory Read was appointed AMD's CEO in August 2011, and the company has now retooled its chip road map as it tries to jump out of its financial struggles.

Tablets have mostly evolved around ARM processors, which are used in notable products such as Apple's iPad, Amazon's Kindle Fire HD and Microsoft's Surface. By comparison, adoption of the more power-hungry x86 tablet chips from Intel and AMD has been much slower.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question