Feds want cars to talk to each other

NTSB promotes tech that could let cars know the velocity of nearby vehicles and react to sudden changes

By , Computerworld |  Hardware

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (AAM), an industry trade group working with the NTSB on connected vehicle technology research, has thrown its support behind the creation of a radio spectrum to be used for vehicle-to-vehicle communication.

Earlier this year, the AAM joined The Intelligent Transportation Society of America and major automakers in urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to protect the 5.9 GHz band of spectrum set aside for connected vehicle technology.

In a statement, the groups said the technology "is expected to save thousands of lives each year -- from potentially harmful interference that could result from allowing unlicensed Wi-Fi-based devices to operate in the band."

A study by the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA) showed that connected vehicle technology "could help prevent the majority of types of crashes that typically occur in the real world, such as crashes at intersections or while changing lanes."

The NTIA's conclusions also revealed some reservations around implementing the technology.

"Further analysis is required to determine whether and how the identified risk factors can be mitigated,: the report said. "While the state-of-the-art of existing and proposed spectrum sharing technologies is advancing at a rapid pace, NTIA recognizes ... the potential risks of introducing a substantial number of new, unlicensed devices into them without proper safeguards."

Lucas Mearian covers storage, disaster recovery and business continuity, financial services infrastructure and health care IT for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian, or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed . His email address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

Read more about emerging technologies in Computerworld's Emerging Technologies Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question