Coca-Cola cloud chief reveals VMware wish list

VMware User Group president talks virtualization in advance of VMworld conference

By , Network World |  Virtualization, VMware

Mariano Maluf is president of the VMware User Group (VMUG), which counts about 80,000 individual members with technical interests related to VMware's virtual-machine software (the group includes local chapters, lots of free education and special interest groups). In his job as cloud ecosystem architecture lead at the Coca-Cola Co., Maluf has firsthand knowledge of deploying VMware products. Here's what's on his mind heading into next week's annual VMworld conference in San Francisco.

[SHOWTIME:Five big things to watch for at VMworld]

Virtualization has fundamentally changed networking. And though today there is competition from Microsoft, KVM, Xen and the like, VMware is virtualization's dominant player in the enterprise. What's the best thing VMware has done so far?

The best thing has been the maturation of the hypervisor layer. Back in the early days there was a risk. Now it's a common element that people put in their designs for the data center. It continues to be a building block. Also, cloud automation and management is something VMware embraced very quickly. Today, the technology is inherently multi-cloud, multi-hypervisor.

But how widespread is multi-hypervisor use, from what you've seen?

It's a concern for users. Some people have different opinions on the viability of that.

So what missteps has VMware made?

One example is the licensing model they put together a few years ago, the vRAM model. VMware could have used different groups and communities and took it as a learning opportunity. They could have reached out to us to have a business discussion. [Editor's note: Last year VMware officially killed its controversial vRAM licensing scheme.]

Virtualization has been widely adopted very quickly, but some think security for it is still catching up. It seems third-party security vendors and VMware have sometimes had a tough go of it in that VMware has run through a number of security APIs, such as vSafe, then shifted away from that and promoted vShield, then changed the name to vCloud Networking and Security. Now security vendors are all talking about NSX APIs related to VMware's new NSX networking and security management product we expect to hear about at VMworld. Meanwhile, Gartner believes there's not really widespread adoption of virtualized security yet as a real substitute for physical appliances. Enterprise IT managers I speak with often say they find this all confusing. What do you think?


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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