Windows 7 May Spur Virtual Desktops, On and Off the iPhone

By Kevin Fogarty, CIO |  Hardware, Citrix, desktop virtualization

Predictions from analysts and virtualization vendors that desktop virtualization will take off during 2010 may be off the mark. Sales may take off, but the desktop PC may not have much to do with it.

VMware, Citrix and a range of other companies are putting clients on smart phones, minimalist thin-client hardware and USB keys in an effort to find something about Virtual Desktop Infrastructures (VDI) that will hook a customer's imagination, says Andi Mann, head of systems and storage-management research at Enterprise Management Associates.

"VMware and Citrix both announced support for the iPhone, which is sexier, even though Blackberries have a greater penetration in business," Mann says. "Virtualization on handhelds is a kind of halo project -like the Chevy Corvette that dazzles customers who come in and end up buying a Chevette."

The Chevette, in this case, is the aging desktop PC or laptop used by any one of millions of corporate workers stuck with Windows XP and looking to upgrade to Windows 7 when it comes out later this year, says Chris Wolf, virtualization and infrastructure specialist at The Burton Group.

"Windows 7 is going to drive a lot of the activity around desktop virtualization for companies that want or need to upgrade to Windows 7," Wolf says.

Bulk migrations will take a long time, but many companies will at least begin moving users to the new OS within weeks or months, Wolf says, and will try to avoid spending the money it would take to upgrade every PC while they do it.

[ For timely virtualization news and expert advice on strategy, see CIO.com's Virtualization Drilldown section. ]

"Strategically, both Citrix and VMware have been planning that Windows 7 would be a major catalyst for desktop virtualization, and have been working toward it for a long time," Wolf says.

VMware announced more than a year ago that its VMware Infrastructure (VI) Client would run on the iPhone.

Citrix Systems demonstrated its iPhone client in May.

"Right now, it's a race to produce client-side hypervisors," according to Wes Wasson, chief marketing officer of Citrix Systems. "With that, [enterprise applications] are just a URL to the user. You could be using a home-office PC or a Mac or a smartphone; as long as the client is there, you have secure access."

Racing to an Anywhere Virtual Client Other software and hardware developers are also racing to build add-ons to make virtualization usable, and devices to make it easy to acquire.

The User Environment Manager from AppSense, for example, is designed to make a virtual desktop mimic the real thing by allowing end users to make changes, install software add photos, store cookies and do all the other things they'd do on an actual "personal" computer.

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