Elgan: Why you'll use Foursquare

By Mike Elgan, Computerworld |  Internet, Foursquare, Social Networking

Suddenly, there are two kinds of people. The first kind loves location-based social networking services like Foursquare. They speak in an alien language about "Mayors" and "Badges" and broadcast their locations to the world.

The second kind is trying hard to ignore these services and their fans. But it's getting harder to do because autogenerated Foursquare posts are increasingly showing up on Twitter and Facebook.

While Foursquare is the most popular of these services, some people are using competitors like Gowalla, Loopt, Brightkite, Yelp, Whrrl and Google Latitude.

If you avoid location services, or are even actively hostile toward them, I'm here to deliver some bad news. Chances are, you'll eventually switch sides and become a user.

I'll tell you why in a minute, but first let me explain how Foursquare works at its most basic level.

You install an app on your location-aware phone. When you launch the app, the service figures out where you are, more or less. You're presented with nearby locations, which are mostly businesses. If you're in one of them, you pick it. If you're not, you can create your own location.

From that location, you can "check in" by pressing a button. Optionally, you can type in a Twitter-size message. This check-in alerts your friends on that service where you are. If you've connected Foursquare to Twitter or Facebook, messages are posted in your stream or on your wall telling of your location and status.

Whoever has the most check-ins at a specific location becomes the Mayor of that location. Other users can see who the Mayor is. And Foursquare awards "Merit Badges" based on where you've checked in and how often, such as "Gym Rat," "Super Mayor" and "I'm on a boat!"

All this checking in, Mayor selection, merit badges and posting on social networks sounds pointless -- or at least like a slow, boring game. To others it feels like a whole lot of creepy stalking. But Foursquare and other location-based social networking services are about to morph into something entirely compelling and different.

What's happening now

Marketers intend to make location-based social networking services worth your while by luring you in with coupons, discounts and exclusive deals.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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