AT&T sees businesses wading slowly into IPv6

By , Network World |  Internet, IPv6

Harrell says companies also need to have an understanding of what user communities on their networks require IPv6 connectivity and where they sit on the network. From there, they need to assess whether they want to implement either dual-stack services that can handle both IPv4 and IPv6 or tunneling services that put IPv6 traffic inside what looks on the outside like IPv4 traffic so it can be sent over IPv4 networks. Harrell recommends that customers use dual stack for most of their needs and says they should only resort to tunneling if their current equipment doesn't support dual stack. The reason for this is that while tunneling can be a low-cost way to provide IPv6 connectivity, it lacks the performance quality that dual stack services provide.

McHenry says one mistake that businesses often make is that they assume IPv6 is something that is only relevant to carriers, when in reality businesses have to take responsibility to determine their own IPv6 needs. However, he says the last couple of years have seen a significant http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/061110-facebook-ipv6.html ">uptick in IT departments becoming more aware that they need to get the ball moving on IPv6 migration, even if they have to do it at a slow but steady pace.

"Most customers now have an understanding that they need to spend energy understanding this topic, whereas a year ago not even half of our customers were in that mode," he says. "There's an inclination among some of our customers that this is a carrier problem alone, but in my view that's not the case."

Read more about lan and wan in Network World's LAN & WAN section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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