Facebook messages: The worst thing that ever happened

Your inability to delete messages and no subject lines are some of the reasons why you should avoid this service

By Sarah Jacobsson Purewal, PC World |  Internet, Facebook, Facebook messaging

Facebook announced Monday that its new messaging system is blurring the line between e-mail and social networking, but that decision is the worst thing that ever happened.

Facebook said it will slowly be rolling out the new, improved, email-esque messaging system over the next few months. While Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg says that the new messaging system is far from a replacement for e-mail, it's also a little too close for comfort.

Here's why you should run, as fast as you can, away from Facebook Messages:

You Can't Delete Messages

Hear that? It's the sound of your worst nightmare coming true -- you will never, ever be able to forget that awful drunken text message you sent to your ex-boyfriend last New Year's Eve (because, hey, text messages and chat messages are all integrated!), because you cannot delete Facebook messages.

OK, to be fair, Facebook does say that, while you can't delete individual messages, you can archive or permanently delete entire threads. If you archive the thread it will still exist (you're basically just hiding it), but if you delete it, it will be gone forever. Or, well, so Facebook says -- for all we know, when you try to delete a conversation thread, your friend's picture will pop up with a note that says "Lisa will miss this message if you delete it :("

Non-Facebook Friends Can E-mail You

So, this wouldn't be such a bad idea if, you know, I didn't already have a completely valid e-mail address, which my non-Facebook friends can use in order to communicate with me.

Let me tell you a story: not too long ago, I uploaded some photos of my trip to Medellin, Colombia, to Facebook. I then tried to send the album to my mother (using Facebook's "share" feature -- where it says something to the extent of "Go ahead, share these photos with your non-Facebook friends!"). My mother was then required to sign up for Facebook in order to view my photos.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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