Information risk in the Wikileaks era

By Michael Versace, IDC Financial Insights Community |  Security, security, Wikileaks

The recent revelations about Wikileaks and its release of 250,000 confidential State Department diplomatic cables shines a new light on the challenges faced by the financial services industry in controlling information risks. Growth in digital universe is already well documented, and recentreseach and analysis that I've participated in one form or another suggest the potential problems are getting more difficult to solve, not less. For instance...

The not-so-recent focus on information governance has generated a renewed interest in records management, the records management profession, and the value of records management to the organization. The role is being redefined in business to be a strategic resource to the CEO as organizations look to better understand, measure, and manage the unprecedented growth in electronic information and the complexities inherent in determining what information to trust, to keep, to secure, to connect, and of course, to discard.

The recognition of the records manager as key component of information governance, and the focus of information governance as a business enabler, are long overdue. Today, one of the most critical asset to any organization is its business information and records. Organizations are struggling to use huge volumes of information to produce better business outcomes. At the same time, the number of high-profile examples of data mismanagement is growing (the Wikileaks leak just one of the most recent), making the need for proper oversight and use of information key to success. A few data points:


Originally published on IDC Financial Insights Community |  Click here to read the original story.
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