Facebook stalking for fun and profit

If Mark Zuckerberg can have his own personal stalker, why can't you? It's easy -- just ignore your Facebook privacy settings.

By  

What do you give a man with $7 billion+ and 600 million close personal friends? How about his very own stalker?

An apparently disturbed individual named Pradeep Manukonda has been hounding Mark Zuckerberg and his sister Randi both on Facebook and in person upwards of 20 times a day, asking for money and allegedly threatening their safety.

According to TMZ (which does not stand for Terrorize Mark Zuckerberg, though it probably should), Brother and Sister Zuck obtained a restraining order against the man.

[ See also: Facebook ads use your face for free ]

Hey, when you’re rich and famous these things just happen. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been approached by guys just like this (though usually they turn out to be process servers). And nobody deserves to be hounded simply because they’re successful.

But I also can’t help snickering just a winchy bit about chickens coming home to roost. When sharing is “the new social norm,” guys like Pradeep are part of the bargain.

There’s a fine line between being a public person and having a private life, which Zuckerberg should understand that better than anybody. (Don’t agree? Go see The Social Network and then let’s talk.). Just because you put stuff about yourself online doesn’t mean it should be fair game for everyone; you should be able to choose who does and doesn’t get to see it. That’s what people like me (and a few million others) have been saying from the get go about Facebook’s privacy controls. Though they are much improved, they’re still not as brain-dead simple as they need to be.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness