Cerf: Future of Internet doesn’t include an IPv7

By Julie Bort, Network World |  Networking, IPv6, Vint Cerf

No, it won't be enough, and I am not a big fan of carrier-grade network address translation. Part of the reason is the whole notion of network address translation is brittle, and it doesn't permit servers to be available on the consumer premises.

In the days when the Internet is highly asymmetric, where you can download traffic faster than you can upload it, putting a server at home is something the broadband providers don't like very much because it consumes a lot of uplink broadband capacity. But with the passage of time, I believe it will be not only desirable, but quite natural, to have servers at home in addition to having use of the cloud. So symmetric capacity and IPv6 are a very attractive outcome and I'm not a big fan of carrier-grade NATs -- but it may turn out that NATs are needed in order to facilitate the transition during this period when we have to run both protocols. (See story: "Can Large Scale NAT Save IPv4?")

Do you think IPv6 in the home is as urgent as it is in the business network?

I think it's urgent in that if we don't get both protocols running at the same time, the day may come when there are servers that can only run IPv6, or there may be users who can only run IPv6 and couldn't get anything else, because the NAT boxes ran out.

I think it's important to get both protocols running smoothly at home. Already laptops and desktops have the capability. It's usually the firewall, the NAT box and maybe the broadband modem that you have at home that haven't been configured for IPv6. (See story: "Cisco Linksys routers still don't support IPv6")

So when we turn on IPv6 on a worldwide basis on June 8 as a 24-hour test (World IPv6 Day), I'm sure there will be things that don't work and those need to be addressed (no pun intended).

I would much rather see a concerted effort to get everybody up and running on IPv6. Then the transition is smooth because it doesn't matter if the destination is running IPv4 or 6, everyone can talk to everyone.

What do you see as the next major consumer use for the Internet?


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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