Celebrate IPv6 Day holiday by continuing not to care

Fund your migration; pay your network uber-geeks to fix it; don't be guilted into spending all your time on it.

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I can't decide if it's reassuring or frightening that the slogan of the organization sponsoring World IPv6 Day is "The Future is Forever."

On one hand it implies that if we don't handle migrations and integrations to IPv6 well, we will still have plenty of time to screw up other things before we lose the whole "future" thing.

On the other it implies the future will be filled with holidays that make "Friendship Day," "Sister's Day" and "National Boss Day" look like heartfelt traditional celebrations by comparison.

Not that there's not a good reason for it.

The Internet Society says the goal of IPv6 Day is " to motivate organizations across the industry — Internet service providers, hardware makers, operating system vendors and web companies — to prepare their services for IPv6 to ensure a successful transition as IPv4 address space runs out."

It's a reasonable goal and genuine issue, especially considering how completely most corporate IT and IT industry organizations have ignored IPv6 since it was proposed 70 or 80 years ago as a long-term fix for fundamental problems with the structure of the Internet.

The cognoscenti – even the networking geeks – continue to avoid IPv6 and anything connected with it as energetically as they can.

Most organizations assign a couple of the more anal/retentive of their net infrastructure people to set up mapping/conversion interfaces so the organization can keep talking to parts of the 'net that have gone 6 – or even to convert much or all of the internal infrastructure to V6, as long as no one else has to know about it.

As important as V6 is, it's not on most people's minds because it should not be.

Except for net infrastructure specialists, web-app programmers, security wonks and the service companies in each of those areas, numerical network addressing should be invisible; it's only slightly less complete a machine-language concern than I/O addressing or raw data expressed in binary.

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