Google, Facebook promise new IPv6 services after trial

By , Network World |  Networking, Facebook, Google

World IPv6 Day was held yesterday and was sponsored by the Internet Society. The event attracted 400-plus corporate, government and university participants that deployed IPv6 on more than 1,000 websites for the day.

Leslie Daigle, chief Internet technology officer for the Internet Society, said World IPv6 Day was designed to motivate service providers, website operators, hardware makers and software suppliers to test-drive IPv6 and to identify any remaining technical issues that need to be resolved with this emerging technology.

"It was perceived to be quite a successful day," Daigle said. "It was an amazing display of cross-industry participation. ... It's an important step in the Internet's progress. We are running out of IPv4 addresses, and IPv6 is definitely the way to move forward to make sure the Internet is a platform for innovation."

Yahoo said it only had to make one minor adjustment to its website for traffic optimization as a result of World IPv6 Day.

"Yahoo is very excited about how smoothly World IPv6 Day went for everybody. It's a great testament to the preparation that went into this event," said Jason Fesler, an IPv6 architect at Yahoo. "The early data says there is minimal risk to pushing forward."

BACKGROUND: World IPv6 Day: Tech industry's most-watched event since Y2K

Akamai and Limelight also said they were stepping up their efforts toward full, commercial-grade support of IPv6 due to the success of World IPv6 Day.

"We're going to look at the data for IPv6 usage and use that to improve our services," said Andy Champagne, director of engineering at Akamai, which had 30 customers participate in World IPv6 Day using its beta IPv6 service. "Then we are going to work with our customers to roll out IPv6."

Tom Coffeen, director of global network architecture for Limelight, said it had IPv6-enabled every server on its network for World IPv6 Day and that it had encountered only minor issues that involved some routing policy changes.

"We were surprised and pleased to see no bugs. The few issues we did encounter were quickly resolved," Coffeen said. "We had many customers choosing to stay IPv6-enabled going forward. We're ready to move to an opt-out model for our customers, where they have to request no IPv6 availability."

Despite these successes, World IPv6 Day participants conceded that IPv6 still has a long way to go before it approaches the ubiquity of IPv4.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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