11 hard truths about HTML5

By Peter Wayner, InfoWorld |  Networking, HTML5

HTML5 heralds some nifty new features and the potential for sparking a Web programming paradigm shift, and as everyone who has read the tech press knows, there is nothing like HTML5 for fixing the Internet. Sprinkle some HTML5 into your code, and your websites will be faster and fancier -- it'll make your teeth white, too. But the reality of what HTML5 can do for those seeking native-app performance on the Web falls short of the hype.

After several years of enjoying HTML5's sophisticated new tags and APIs, the time is ripe to admit that there are serious limitations with the model. Not only are there reasons to grouse about HTML5 failing to fulfill our Web nirvana dreams, there are even reasons to steer away from HTML5 in some cases.

[ Find out which 10 apps are pushing HTML5 to the limit. | Also on InfoWorld: "HTML5 in the browser: Canvas, video, audio, and graphics" | "HTML5 in the browser: Local data storage | "HTML5 in the browser: HTML5 data communications" | "HTML5 in the browser: HTML5 forms" | "HTML in the browser: Geolocation, JavaScript, and HTML5 extras" ]

The truth is, despite its powerful capabilities, HTML5 isn't the solution for every problem. Its additional features are compelling and will help make Web apps formidable competitors for native apps, but security issues, limitations of local data storage, synchonization challenges, and politics should have us all scaling back our expectations for the spec. After all, every technology has its limitations.

What follows is a list of 11 hard truths Web developers must accept in making the most of HTML5.

HTML5 hard truth No. 1: Security is a nightmare

The fundamental problem with client-side computing is that the user ultimately has control over the code running on the machine. In the case of Web apps, when your browser comes with a great debugging tool, this control is easier than ever to abuse.

With a JavaScript debugger like Firebug, anyone who is curious about what Facebook, Google, or any other website is doing can just start inserting breakpoints and watch the code. This is great for debugging and learning how websites operate, but it's a nightmare for security.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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