Groups still oppose SOPA after proposed amendment

Smith's proposed amendment of the Stop Online Piracy Act still retains several problems, critics say

By , IDG News Service |  Internet

A proposed amendment to the controversial copyright enforcement bill, the Stop Online Piracy Act, has not swayed many opponents to the legislation.

The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), Public Knowledge, and NetCoalition all voiced opposition Tuesday to Representative Lamar Smith's proposed amendment to the bill, known as SOPA. Smith, a Texas Republican and main sponsor of the bill, offered a 71-page amendment to the bill late Monday, ahead of a Thursday hearing to amend and vote on the bill in the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.

Smith's amendment attempted to address some criticisms of the bill, which would allow the U.S. Department of Justice and copyright holders to ask for court orders blocking payment processors and online advertising networks from doing business with foreign sites accused of infringing copyright.

SOPA remains "unbalanced" and lacks protections for websites falsely accused of copyright infringements, said Gary Shapiro, CEA's president and CEO. SOPA would allow copyright holders -- most U.S. residents, in Shapiro's estimation -- to file lawsuits aimed at shutting down websites they accuse of infringement, he said during a press briefing. Most Web users have posted something creative online and own a copyright, and under the bill, they could file SOPA complaints against websites, Shapiro said.

SOPA and Protect IP, a similar bill in the Senate, won't pass through Congress, however, because of an uprising of grassroots opposition from voters and Internet users, Shapiro predicted. "I'd like to say CEA had some brilliant strategists here that somehow got millions[m] of Americans to rise up and talk about copyright law," he said. "I've been trying to do that for 30 years and failed."

NetCoalition, an advocacy group with Google, Twitter, eBay and Facebook among its members, commended Smith for attempting to address concerns with SOPA, but said it cannot support his amendment.

The amendment still allows private lawsuits against U.S. Internet companies and would expose large websites to court action if a small portion contains infringing content, NetCoalition said.

Smith's amendment would continue to allow court orders filtering web addresses or blocking domain names, which "should be concerning for internet security experts and human rights activists alike," added Sherwin Siy, deputy legal director at Public Knowledge.

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