Real-time wiki Hackpad makes Web collaboration fast and easy

Hackpad is a very simple-to-use real-time wiki with innovative features and a free plan.

By Erez Zukerman, PC World |  Unified Communications, collaboration

Another tradition Hackpad breaks is the wiki syntax for links: Most wikis use double brackets to link to other pages. Hackpad uses the trendy at symbol (@), which does double duty: You can use it both to link to other pages, and to mention (and invite) other users. When you log onto Hackpad using a Google account, it accesses your contacts. Then, when you make an @ symbol and start writing the name of a contact, their full name and email pop up. Just hit Enter, and the contact is invited to edit the document with you (you don't have to use your Google account if you don't want to). Linking to other pages is also incredibly simple: Just write @, start typing their name and Hackpad will offer to autocomplete it. And if you paste in a link to some rich content (say, a YouTube video), Hackpad will immediately embed that video for you into the page. If you're coding, Hackpad offers syntax highlighting for several languages such as HTML, JavaScript, and CoffeeScript.

Hackpad includes easy to use privacy controls: You can set a page to be public, open only to people who have its link (like the mode Google offers for sharing Picasa albums), or open only to people you've explicitly invited.

Hackpad does not yet offer commercial plans, but its free offering is full-featured, and feels amazingly fun and simple to use. If you've ever felt frustrated and limited by your current collaboration tools, take Hackpad for a ten-minute spin. Careful: It's addictive.

Note: The Download button takes you to the vendor's site, where you can use this Web-based software.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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