The IPv6 bandwagon has left the station, but who is onboard?

By Dean Perrine, Network World |  Networking, IPv6

But challenges related to IPv6 implementation remain, relating specifically to transition complexities, costs,
timelines and the overall business of the migration from IPv4 to IPv6.
These challenges include:

* Operational challenges: The operational challenges are, actually, no different from the normal challenges of
running any network: Staff training and equipment updates take place as in the normal business cycle. All modern
network equipment is IPv6-ready -- it just needs the staff to run it. The actual transition -- like any technical
upgrade -- takes planning and resources, but in operation it quickly becomes a standard operational environment.
Still, for those without the necessary recourses or in-house expertise, IPv6 implementation challenges can be
overwhelming ... and expensive.

* Transition and implementation challenges: IPv6 has been hamstrung by bad press, says Lance, especially the
view that IPv6 is a purely technical transition without financial justification. Communication has been a disaster
between levels of organizations: Businesspeople, who comprehend the strategic implications, have not been in
effective communication with network people, caught up in the technical details, who fail to understand what IPv6
can offer business at a higher level.

Once an organization decides it will move to IPv6, the greatest transition hurdle is overcome! All reports so
far are that IPv6 is easier to implement than people fear, and the benefits of efficiency and economy quickly
become apparent. It's not an all-or-nothing environment: IPv6 can be implemented in stages as required, Lance
says.

* Financial investment justification: IPv6 networks are easier to manage than IPv4 networks, so ultimately less
expensive. For instance, merging two networks when businesses combine or expand becomes extremely easy under IPv6,
but under IPv4 today can be costly. This is because most internal IPv4 networks use the same RFC1918 private number
space, so a merger means an expensive renumbering exercise to avoid clashes and black holes.

In IPv6 the vast address range means this would never happen. In fact, any network reorganization or expansion
becomes easier due to IPv6's numbering scheme, which over time means cheaper networks. IPv6 also has mobility and
security features that when implemented have
enormous implications for financially beneficial innovation.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question