Euro-based body starts handing out its last block of IPv4 addresses

Puts more pressure on operators and enterprises to roll out IPv6

By , IDG News Service |  Internet

The organization offers training to all members and is also doing roadshows with APNIC and MENOG (Middle East Network Operators Group). In addition, the IPv6 Act Now website has a wealth of information for everyone from small businesses to governments.

On June 6, RIPE NCC also took part in the World IPv6 Launch event, which resulted in IPv6 traffic growing from 0.06 percent to almost 0.15 percent of all Internet traffic, according to Arbor Networks.

While that was considered a success, it also shows how far IPv6 has to go.

There any many reasons for this, but the most common reason is that time and money needs to be invested in deploying IPv6 on existing networks and on training, Pawlik said via email.

However, it now has become time to make room for training and lab equipment in the budget, as well as time, according to Jörgen Eriksson, project manager for IPv6 at .SE, the organization in charge of the Swedish top domain.

"It is no longer possible to just turn a blind eye, since we now have hit the wall we have talked about for such a long time," said Eriksson.

The scarcity of IPv4 addresses has resulted in a market for buying and selling them. The amount of money that operators and other entities are willing to pay for IP addresses usually isn't detailed. But last year Microsoft paid Nortel US$7.5 million for 666,624 IPv4 addresses, or $11.25 a piece.

"We are going to see more of that because there are those that just need more addresses," said Eriksson, who calls the sale of IPv4 addresses "a necessary evil", but hopes it will help spur the roll out of IPv6.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com

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