6 signs that the U.S. is overtaking the world at IPv6

By , Network World |  Networking, IPv6

U.S. Websites that drive the most page views are also the leaders in IPv6 deployment. Of the 10 most popular Websites on the Internet, five support IPv6. All five of these Websites - Google, Facebook, YouTube, Yahoo and Wikipedia - are run by U.S. companies. Overall, the U.S. generated 13% -- or 399 -- of the 2,999 Websites that participated in the Internet Society's World IPv6 Launch Day in June.

3. Carriers

Akamai reports that six IPv6 access networks account for 86% of its IPv6 requests. Three of these networks -- Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Comcast -- are U.S. companies. The other leading IPv6 access networks are France's Free, Japan's KDDI and Romania's RCS & RDS, Akamai says. Akamai also reports that 73% of the IPv6 addresses that it sees are from the United States, a sign of carrier progress.

4. Traffic

North America is driving more IPv6 traffic than any other region of the world, according to Akamai. Here are the peak traffic volumes reported by Akamai for each region:

Region Peak IPv6 Traffic Volume Date

1. North America 92,891 hits/sec 9/11/2012

2. Europe 48,488 hits/sec 9/11/2012

3. Asia 14,540 hits/sec 7/8/2012

4. South America 549 hits/sec 8/24/2012

5. Africa 152 hits/sec 8/23/2012

5. Products

U.S. vendors have the most IT products that have been approved by the IPv6 Forum's IPv6 Ready program, which runs conformance and interoperability tests. U.S. companies including Cisco, HP and Juniper have run 425 networking products such as routers and hosts through the IPv6 Ready process. This compares to 350 IPv6 Ready products from Japanese vendors and 250 from Taiwanese vendors.

6. Government Leadership


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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