ICANN to replace Digital Archery program with gTLD domain raffle

ICANN hopes to use a lottery to decide which new top-level domain applications will be evaluated first

By Loek Essers, IDG News Service |  Internet

"No contracts will be fully executed or delegations made prior to the ICANN meeting in Beijing," said ICANN. The Beijing meeting is scheduled to take place from April 7 to 11.

"Due to the rules regarding such drawings, ICANN will not be able to sell the tickets via the Internet, but only to applicants or their representatives directly," ICANN said, adding that there are also requirements regarding the use of proceeds for such drawing "that will be strictly adhered to."

Using this process the delegation of gTLDs is expected to start in June or July next year, half a year earlier than recent estimates. Initially though, the delegation of gTLDs was planned to start this fall.

"For me it is still a six month delay," said Jannik Skou, partner at consulting firm Thomsen Trampedach, who assists companies in applying for gTLDs. The whole ongoing process concerning batching systems, from Digital Archery to the now proposed lottery, is "a farce", he said.

But he favors the lottery over Digital Archery. "Anything is better than Digital Archery," he said, adding that he still wonders why ICANN didn't think the whole process through before it started. "It seems like a waste of time not holding a lottery immediately," he said. But it is a relief to know now what the probable pace of the process will be, he said.

Skou still has some criticisms of the new process, especially of ICANN's decision to prioritize the evaluation of internationalized domain name (IDN) applications. The 114 applications for generic top level domain names in non-Latin scripts such as Chinese, Arabic or Japanese will get priority in order to promote diversity and make the Internet more accessible, ICANN said.

"I'm puzzled why IDNs get priority," said Skou. If a company such as Yahoo or Google for instance had known beforehand that IDNs would be handled first they might have applied for a Chinese gTLD first, he said. "Such exemptions should have been announced in advance."

Skou said he still hopes that the gTLD draw proposal will be approved. Whether that will happen depends on two things: the reaction of applicants, who still have about four weeks to comment on ICANN's plan in an internal review, and on the state of California, which has yet to approve the lottery license. The public comment process will undoubtedly yield a lot of criticism, said Skou.

Fairwinds Partners, an internet consulting firm, said in a blog post it expected the gTLD draw to be a hot topic during next week's ICANN meeting in Toronto.

Loek covers all things tech for the IDG News Service. Follow him on Twitter at @loekessers or email tips and comments to loek_essers@idg.com

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