Looking forward to a future Internet

By , Network World |  Networking

Eighty-nine out of 150 countries attending have signed the WCIT documents. Just about all of the signers included some level of reservation with their signature. (See http://files.wcitleaks.org/public/S12-WCIT12-C-0066!!MSW-E.pdf and http://files.wcitleaks.org/public/S12-WCIT12-C-0067!!MSW-E.pdf) Some of the countries that did not sign will do so after discussing it internally and others, including the United States, may never sign. Even those that do sign may withdraw the signature or add to their reservations after their internal ratification processes play out. The countries that do ratify the treaty will have some additional blessing to limit the Internet in their countries and may use that blessing to push through controls that they likely could legally have done anyway.

Despite the WCIT process, it looks like the Internet will continue to be a force for technological and business change. At least, until we have to go through the same soft of fire drill for the ITU's 2014 Plenipotentiary Conference in Busan, Korea. The Plenipotentiary Conference is where the ITU decides on its own, supposedly within whatever constraints the treaties agreed to at the WCIT include, what its powers are and what it will do.

Disclaimer: Most organizations, including Harvard, do engage in some self-determination of role and authority, but most do not think they can run the Internet. In any case, the above is my own review and prediction.

Read more about lan and wan in Network World's LAN & WAN section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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