Google sees one password ring to rule them all

Google researchers have proposed a USB key, or even a finger ring, to solve the problems with website passwords

By Zach Miners, IDG News Service |  Internet

The technology aims to improve upon the company's current, optional two-step verification system. With that system, when users want to log into a Google service from a new computer, they're prompted to enter a code sent to their preregistered mobile phone, granting them access to the site.

The company says its experience with that system has been good, though it too can be abused by account hackers. After they steal a password and break into an account, they sometimes set up a two-factor authentication using their own phone number, "just to slow down account recovery by the true owner," the Google engineers wrote.

Google admits its proposed USB key approach is "speculative" and that it will need to be accepted on a wide scale. But the firm said it is eager to test the device with other websites.

"User device registration with target websites should be simple and shouldn't require a relationship with Google or any other third party," the engineers write. "The registration and authentication protocols must be open and free for anyone to implement in a browser, device, or website."

Google didn't say if or when the experimental system might make it into use. "We're focused on making authentication more secure, and yet easier to manage. We believe experiments like these can help make login systems better," a spokesman said via email.

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