Critics question wording of Internet freedom bill

The Republican bill could limit the U.S. FCC and other agencies, some digital rights groups say

By , IDG News Service |  Internet

Legislation that would make it official U.S. policy to promote a global Internet "free from government control" could restrict the U.S. Federal Communications Commission from using its authority and prevent law enforcement agencies from taking action against cybercriminals, some critics have said.

Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee objected to the bill during a hearing to amend it Wednesday, after some digital rights groups also raised concerns this week.

Supporters of the bill said it's an attempt to send a clear signal to other countries that the U.S. opposes a takeover of Internet governance by the United Nations' International Telecommunication Union, but critics questioned if the legislation was a back-handed effort to limit the authority of the FCC.

The bill, similar to a sense-of-Congress resolution that passed last year before the ITU's World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), allows lawmakers to again question the FCC's net neutrality rules and limit the agency's authority in a coming transition to all-IP networks by telecom carriers, said Representative Doris Matsui, a California Democrat.

"This bill will have many unintended consequences on domestic telecom policy," she said. "The bill is about rehashing the debates of the past. The bill is also about prejudicing the debates of the future, specifically concerning the transition to IP-based voice services."

Representative Anna Eshoo, also a California Democrat, asked the Energy and Commerce Committee's communications subcommittee to change the bill from official government policy back to a sense-of-Congress resolution. The subcommittee should also make it clear that its aim is to shield the Internet from the control of international regulatory bodies, not from domestic agencies, she wrote in a letter to subcommittee Chairman Greg Walden, an Oregon Republican.

The current language in the bill "could affect domestic efforts by the United States and our allies to address cybersecurity, combat cybercrimes, maintain public safety, and ensure the free flow of information over the Internet," she wrote.

The bill would make it official U.S. government policy to "promote a global Internet free from government control and to preserve and advance the successful multistakeholder model that governs the Internet."

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