AP Twitter hack prompts fresh look at cybersecurity needs

Two-step identity verification and analysis of user trends could prevent future attacks, experts say

By Zach Miners, IDG News Service |  Internet

Twitter is a big target for breaches because of its immediacy, Obenhaim said. One of Twitter's primary purposes is to disseminate information in near real time, for example, while company pages on Facebook are often less active.

Other ideas that have been floated to keep accounts and identifies safe online include the use of "physical" passwords, which could take the form of a piece of jewelry. In a research paper released in January, Google said the current strategies, including the two-step verification system, are insufficient.

The stakes are high when it comes to cybersecurity, as Tuesday's stock market tumble showed. "Brand or character defamation is no longer the only outcome," said nCircle's Storms.

Posting fictitious tweets about outrageous behavior by employees at Burger King is one thing, but tweeting that the president has been injured following an explosion at the White House "can have a serious impact" more broadly, Duo's Oberheide noted.

Such hacks are also more significant since the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said it would allow public companies to disclose material corporate information on social media sites.

The SEC declined to comment Tuesday on the AP's and other recent Twitter hacks.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question