Google to boost speed, cut data use on mobile devices

Chrome's speed and developer tools are being brought to Android mobile devices

By Zach Miners, IDG News Service |  Internet

To address the issue, Google has built a feature into Chrome that collects the user's payment info and makes it available across other devices. At participating shopping sites, when the user goes to check out at an online store, a form will appear with the person's payment information already filled in. The person can just review the billing and shipping information and hit "submit," Google said.

For Android developers, Google highlighted a new way to build their own HTML tags. Pitched as the "first toolkit to natively take advantage of Web components," the feature is designed to let developers reuse bits of JavaScript, CSS and HTML code across different device platforms to simplify app development. This is an early stage project, Google emphasized.

"The goal here is to be able to allow developers to create their own tags, use them on a phone, and then take those same components onto a tablet," said Upson.

There has been a lot of speculation that Chrome and Android will be brought closer together now that they are run by the same person. Google's Andy Rubin left his post as head of Android in March.

Use of the Chrome browser has been growing steadily over the past couple of years, Google said at I/O. At the time of last year's show, there were 450 million monthly active users, and there are now more than 750 million, Google reported.

"We're just beginning to push the mobile Web forward," said Google's Pichai.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

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