Lawyer: Verizon should be able to block websites

Congress didn't authorize the FCC to pass net neutrality rules, Verizon's lawyer tells an appeals court

By , IDG News Service |  Internet

Verizon Communications should be able to block its broadband customers from going to websites that refuse to pay the provider to deliver their traffic, a lawyer for Verizon told an appeals court Monday.

Current U.S. Federal Communications Commission rules prohibiting broadband providers from selectively blocking or slowing Web traffic go beyond the agency's authority granted by the U.S. Congress in the Telecommunications Act of 1996, Verizon lawyer Helgi Walker told judges in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Verizon is appealing FCC net neutrality rules passed in December 2010.

The net neutrality rules prevent Verizon from charging websites for bringing traffic to them, Walker told the three judges. "But for these rules, we could be pursuing those types of commercial arrangements," she said. "My client wants freedom to explore that."

Congress did not give the FCC the authority to regulate broadband in the same way it regulates so-called common-carrier telephone networks and the FCC itself had long stayed away from broadband regulation before passing the net neutrality rules, Walker said.

The FCC found new authority to regulate broadband more than 10 years after Congress passed the Telecom Act," she said. "Poof, it discovers direct authority that apparently was hiding in plain sight."

Lawyers for the FCC and a coalition of groups that filed briefs supporting the rules faced a skeptical panel of judges. Judge David Tatel repeatedly asked lawyers for both sides if the court could uphold the FCC's antiblocking rule, preventing broadband providers from totally blocking their customers from going to some websites, while rejecting the agency's antidiscrimination rule, preventing broadband providers from giving some Web traffic preferential treatment.

The antidiscrimination rule seems to be a common carrier rule, Tatel said.

Congress, in section 706 of the Telecom Act gave the FCC authority to encourage broadband deployment to the entire U.S. and to take steps to accelerate deployment when it isn't available nationwide, countered Sean Lev, general counsel at the FCC. The net neutrality rules remove barriers to investment in Internet services and promotes competition, as section 706 instructs, he said.

Verizon shouldn't be able to charge its consumer broadband customers, then "extort" another fee from websites that the provider's customers want to read, Lev said

Lev also rejected Verizon's claim that the net neutrality rules violate its First Amendment free speech rights. Verizon is free to publish its own websites, but it isn't acting as a speaker when carrying customers' traffic, he said.

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