Add technologists to surveillance tech review panel, IT groups say

Tech groups say an Obama review board of NSA surveillance lacks technical expertise

By , IDG News Service |  Internet

U.S. President Barack Obama should add actual technologists to a group reviewing the nation's surveillance technologies, IT-related groups have said.

The President's Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technology, announced in August after revelations of large-scale data collection and surveillance programs at the U.S. National Security Agency, has five members, with four of them former government officials. But the board is "limited in technical expertise," said Sascha Meinrath, director of the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation, a Washington, D.C., think tank.

The board has an undefined scope, and it's unclear what exactly the group is reviewing, Meinrath wrote in comments about the review board, due Monday.

"Revelations regarding the breadth and scope of the NSA's surveillance have raised serious concerns among a variety of stakeholders within and outside the United States, including technology companies, civil liberties groups, and the millions of citizens who rely upon digital communications in their personal and professional lives," Meinrath wrote. "It is critical that the Administration rebuild trust in the United States as a benevolent steward of the Internet and reaffirm the nation's respect for international law and commitment to protecting civil liberties and human rights both at home and abroad."

Meinrath's comments follow similar criticisms of the board filed by a group of 47 high-profile technologists last Friday. The review group needs "competent technical advice to do its job properly," said the group in comments filed. "A technologist can situate advancements in modern technology, how they work, white is possible, how data moves through infrastructure, and how modern technology may implicate privacy and security."

Among the IT experts signing the letter were staff members at the Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electronic Frontier Foundation; Apache Web server developer Brian Behlendorf; Princeton University computer science Professor Ed Felton; Johns Hopkins University computer security Professor Matthew Green; Mozilla senior policy engineer Chris Riley; cryptographer Bruce Schneier; and PGP creator Phil Zimmerman.

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