7 Reasons Websites Are No Longer Safe

By , CSO |  Internet, Sophos

"The hacker essentially takes advantage of flaws related to shoddy site development," Wang said.

3. User-provided content

It doesn't take a genius to write a comment to a blog posting or something they see on a social networking site like Facebook or Twitter. The bad guys know this and are therefore taking the opportunity to pollute discussion threads and other sources of user-supplied content with spam-laden links. (See "Seven Deadly Sins of Social Networking Security".)

"You can get comment spam, completely irrelevant comments including links to sites trying to sell you stuff," Wang said. "They can also try posting full links to malicious sites or work in a little scripting, depending on the filter they are trying to work around."

4. Stolen site credentials

Using the types of malware and social networking tactics described above, as well as other means, attackers can steal the content provider's log-in credentials. From there it's no sweat logging into the site and making changes. It typically is a change so subtle and small that it escapes notice. The tiny bits of code added in can then steal the site visitor's credit card or other data.

5. Compromised hosting service

This one is similar to number 4, where the credentials of the content provider are stolen and hackers log in to make sinister changes. Through this vector, Wang said the bad guys could potentially poison thousands of sites the provider is hosting in one strike.

6. Local malware

The website you visit may be perfectly safe, but if there's malware hidden on your own machine you can unwittingly become part of the attack, Wang said. For example, the user can visit their online banking site, and when typing in a user name and password the Trojan is there to record that information and pass it back to the attacker, allowing him to go in later and empty out your account or that of others.

7. Hacker-engineered fakes

Finally, there's the problem of hackers trying to sell you fake merchandise that includes phony security software. If a box appears warning that your machine may have been infected and that you must immediately download a particular security tool to remove it--a common occurrence if you have visited a site that surreptitiously downloads malware onto your computer--it's a sure sign of trouble.

"You spend your $39.95 and you get a worthless piece of software, and at the same time you have given them your credit card data," Wang said.

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