Google feeds mobile social craze with a little Buzz

By , Computerworld |  Internet, Google, google buz

A mobile version of Google's new Buzz social networking offering lets the company take advantage of the increasing number of consumers looking to post updates about their daily lives from the grocery store, the local coffee shop, a neighborhood restaurant or anywhere else they go during a day.

Google yesterday took the wraps off wired and mobile versions of Google Buzz -- a set of tools designed to make its popular Gmail more of a social networking hub than a simple e-mail service.

The new social networking tool set is designed to help users more easily find the most important information contained in their flood of social posts, pictures and videos.

The company also plans to add an enterprise version of Google Buzz at an undisclosed future date.

Stuart Williams, an analyst at Technology Business Research Inc., said the decision to include a mobile version of Google Buzz from the start was a good one by the Internet firm.

"People are mobile social beings. It's integral," said Williams. "Mobility is an incredibly important part of life for a great many people. There are large segments of the U.S. and European population where that type of social networking is just part of their culture. Sharing information with friends and family on a constant basis is just expected."

A mobile version is essential if Google wants to seriously challenge social networking leaders like Facebook and Twitter, he added.

"I think any social networking platform that wants to be successful today has to be mobile," added Williams. "Mobile. Mobile. Mobile. That's the message here."

Bloggers and others are already focusing attention and seeking more information on the mobile version's so-called Nearby feature. The feature is all about location relevancy, Google Buzz Product Manager Todd Jackson, said during the unveiling of the tool set yesterday.

Buzz determines the location of users using GPS technology. Buzz sends those coordinates to the Google cloud, which sends the user's location back to the phone. Buzz then asks the user whether he or she is willing to verify they're at the noted location.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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