Vast Majority Feel Internet Access is a Right

A survey conducted by the BBC finds that 80 percent of users feel that Internet access is a right, not a privilege

By Tony Bradley, PC World |  Internet, BBC, Tech & society

A recent survey conducted by the BBC found that the vast majority of users around the world consider access to the Internet to be a right. The speed at which Internet access has gone from a privilege, to a luxury, and now to a right is a testament to how transformative it has been--shaping politics, news, entertainment, research, and more.

While individual users have come to view Internet and Web access as a right, it seems almost ludicrous to consider it anything other than a complete necessity for businesses today. Part of the reason that the current initiatives of the United States FCC are so important is that an open Internet is a requirement for keeping the business playing field level, and access to reasonable broadband speeds is essential for conducting business efficiently and effectively.

The BBC report states "Most web users are very positive about the changes the internet has brought to their lives, with strong support for the information available, the greater freedom it brings and social networking."

Almost four in five respondents agreed that the Internet provides greater freedom, while an overwhelming 90 percent cited the Internet as a great learning resource. More than half of those surveyed acknowledge spending time on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter.

The results from China are quite interesting--particularly given the Chinese government's censorship of the Internet and the ongoing battle with Google. Almost nine in ten Chinese respondents feel that the Internet is a right. More peculiar is that China was behind Japan, South Korea, France, and Germany when it comes to feeling that the Internet is not a safe place to openly express opinions.

It would seem that either Chinese Internet users are unaware of the monitoring and censorship conducted by the Chinese government, or our perception from outside of China is much more draconian than what Chinese citizens actually experience.

More than half of those polled feel that the government should not regulate the Internet. The report claims that 53 percent of users agreed with the statement "the Internet should never be regulated by any level of government anywhere."

While net neutrality opponents might jump on that finding as evidence that the majority--however slim--feel that the government should keep its hands off the Internet, it seems to me that takes the survey question out of context to some degree.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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