iPhone jailbreak: 5 apps to control your privacy

Jailbreaking your iPhone gives you complete control over the device, enabling you to install tools that keep data under your control

By Ian Paul, PC World |  Consumerization of IT, iPhone, iphone jailbreak

Don't bet on the new agreement between the State of California, Apple, Google and others to protect information on your iPhone from data-snooping third-party apps such as the social networking service Path. If you really want to protect your data, there's only one way to do it: jailbreak your iPhone. Jailbreaking gives you complete control (and responsibility) over your phone, enabling you to install all kinds of tools that make sure your data stays where it belongs: under your control.

Here's a look at five post-jailbreak tools that don't leave it up to Apple, Google or any other company to look after your best interests and put you in complete control of your data.

The state of smartphone privacy

California on Wednesday announced a new agreement with Amazon, Apple, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, and Research In Motion. These companies in the coming months will ensure that third-party apps in their respective stores supply a privacy policy that you can review before you install an app detailing any personal data the app wants to access. Any app that doesn't comply could be prosecuted under California's Unfair Competition or False Advertising Laws.

The agreement was six months in the making, but comes after recent high-profile incidents where apps were found to be grabbing a user's personal data without notifying that individual. The most notable was Path, a social networking app available for iPhone and Android that was uploading users' address books to their servers without notifying them. Path has since changed its ways, and since then numerous apps have been outed as data-grabbing software including Foodspotting, Twitter, and Yelp.

While California's move to protect user privacy is welcome news, the agreement still requires users to trust that California prosecutors, app store providers, and app makers are all doing their job and behaving themselves.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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