A year after killer tsunami, Sony factory faces tough reality

The factory earned praise from executives and the community for its heroism, but now is confronted with job cuts and a tough economy

By Jay Alabaster, IDG News Service |  Consumerization of IT

The story of this Sony factory, which took the full brunt of a powerful tsunami that washed through a year ago, reflects that of much of Japan's northeastern coast - abrupt tragedy, battled with ingenuity and stoic resolve, and now grim economic reality.

Electronics factories throughout the region were disrupted by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and deadly tsunamis that followed on March 11 last year, but few took the damage like Sony's Sendai Technology Center, located less than a mile from the sea.

Earthquakes are common in the region, but tsunamis less so. Locals were caught off guard when the waters crashed this far inland, flooding to meters deep within minutes and carrying a churning morass of cars and debris. Many in the neighborhood raced to take refuge in the facility's main building, at six stories high the tallest around.

Employees at the factory, Sony's main production base for professional videotapes, blank Blu-ray Discs and other media products, quickly made makeshift rafts from containers and other materials. They used them to pluck people from the freezing waters and later to ferry food and supplies to nearby shelters. CEO Howard Stringer would publicly commend them for their "bravery, generosity and ingenuity."

When the water receded in the following days, the roads were completely blocked with smashed cars and debris, and contents of the factory had spilled out into the surrounding neighborhood. Weeks later, blue labels from Sony's video tapes still fluttered around the mud-caked streets nearby.

Workers clad in masks, protective suits and thick boots set about restoring the factory almost immediately after the waters cleared, but the Sendai Technology Center was among the last of Sony's tsunami-damaged plants to come online. Full production didn't begin for nearly six months, and the manufacturing of some parts was shifted to other locations entirely.

Today, when factory employees arrive they park across the street from a lot piled high with stacks of smashed vehicles, and walk by dump trucks and large cranes that are still making repairs. Sony representatives declined interview requests and access to the factory grounds.

The plant is located in Tagajo, a sleepy suburb of 61,000 residents. They were spared the utter devastation of other communities nearby, their 189 dead or missing a small portion of the 19,000 overall in Japan. But nearly half the families there had damage to their homes, as well as hundreds of local businesses.

The Sony factory once again stepped into the void, making about a third of its 113,000 square meters of floor space available to local businesses, free of charge. A local government-backed organization that is running the program has signed up nine companies and filled half the available space.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Consumerization of ITWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question