Extreme BYOD: When consumer tech goes to unexpected places

Your laptop will get less spacesick than you

By , ITworld |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD

In the 1960s, the future was still kind of futuristic

Source: Brandrodungswanderfeldhackbau/Wikipedia

If there's one phrase I associate with the future, it's control panels. You know, the gleaming, custom built set of controls that provide a direct interface to the advanced machines that we use in our every day lives, here in the futuristic world of the 21st century.

But a funny thing happened along the way to that vision: we invented general-purpose computers, some small enough to fit in your hand, and made them cheap enough that most people could buy one or three. And those mundane consumer devices began to show up in the most extreme places -- and in some cases, to complement or even displace the equipment that was already there.

[ Computing fossils: Old tech holding on for dear life | 6 things every IT person should know ]

 

Would Captain Kirk use the same laptop as an Earth-bound accountant?

Source: NASA, via Wikipedia

With the International Space Station, the human race has finally built a long-lived, honest-to-goodness spaceship -- even if it never gets more than a few hundred miles from the earth's surface. The word "spaceship," of course, evokes images of gleaming banks of computers built into the ship's bulkheads, ready to control its various systems. It doesn't exactly summon up the image of an ordinary laptop, of the sort that would be used by a typical white-collar worker on Earth, being used for crucial tasks. But that's exactly what astronauts use, with IBM ThinkPads playing important roles on the station.

Those ThinkPads had to be rigorously certified to work with the Space Station, of course; you can't just plug any Windows laptop into the ISS's systems willy-nilly. That doesn't mean that astronauts have to be completely separated from their beloved gadgets, though: a recent unmanned resupply mission brought iPads up to play with, though don't expect the station's robotic arm to be controlled by an iOS app any time soon.

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