The new iPhone 5: rumours, tech specs, Liquidmetal, 3D cameras, 4in display and more

We take a look at all the iPhone 5 rumours and try to see if there's a kernal of truth in the field of chaff

By Mark Hattersley, Macworld U.K. |  Consumerization of IT, 4G, Apple

Wireless sync iCloud and iTunes Match all point towards wireless syncing as the future, but the device still has to get power somehow. This has led to speculation that Apple may be ready to introduce inductive charging, where the iPhone gets its power by lying on a flat surface which magically sends the charge through the case. Any removal of the dock connector would destroy the speaker ecosystem that surrounds Apple, which is hardly likely to enamour any speaker owners to purhcasing a new phone. We're not sure if that's what Apple wants.

RAM The great thing about predicting that the next generation of iPhone will have 1GB or RAMis that eventually you'll be right. We think the time is more or less about right (we thought the iPhone 4S would have 1GB of RAM, although it doesn't seem to suffer in any way for still having 512MB). If it needs 1GB to run

The iPhone with inductive charging plate

whatever new feautures it has smoothly, and doesn't intefere with battery life, we have no doubt it'll get it.

Battery life Apple has consistently been aiming for about 7 hours of talk time on the iPhone (and 10 hours on the iPad). Whatever new features are included we believe Apple will ensure that it still has the same amount of battery performance, which seems to be one of the key driving factors in whether people are happy with their phones in day-to-day use.

Shock, drop, and water-proof At CES 2012 two companies, Liquipel and Hz0, made a splash with technology capable of making gadgets completely waterproof. Not in the sense of an old waterproof camera, with it's sealed case, but a regular gadget like an iPhone or iPad, with all the ports open and buttons unsealed. The new technology coats all the inside and outside of your device with a clear "nano" coating that repels water. Apple executives were allegedly impressed with the system and a rumour suggests that retail outlets in the UK are gearing up to change their insurance documents with regard to water damage. Apple has a patent regarding waterproofing the iPhone, so it's clearly thought about it. Apple also has a patent on a system that prevents glass from cracking. The patent explains a inflatable mount between the screen and case that expands if the phone detects that it's being dropped, as well as 'exotic materials' that prevent the glass from shattering (read more at patentlyapple.com). Add this to the tougher Liquidmetal case and it could be that the iPhone has a strong case, screen and is waterproof. It could be that the iPhone 5's unique point is its strength and resiliance.


Originally published on Macworld U.K. |  Click here to read the original story.
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