Cellphone vibration syndrome and other signs of tech addiction

New book, iDisorder, looks at the dangers and offers advice for dealing with obsession

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, Facebook, LinkedIn

A lot of companies are developing wired workplaces, in the sense that employees can get access to their work regardless of whether it's a company-owned device or a personal smartphone. Won't the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) push exacerbate the problem? I do believe it probably will. I think it's (BYOD) a good idea. Businesses are starting to realize that it's nice to have a dedicated Blackberry just for your work, but it's also nice to have your employees to be on 24-by-7 because they are carrying the device they're using. I do think that's going to be a problem because then you're multiplying it by two, your device is both your personal device and business device so there is twice as much free-floating anxiety.

How do you counterattack that? There are two things you can do. You don't have to carry your device 24-by-7. What I suggest is you develop your own tech break. About every couple of hours find one way to get away from all of it, phones, computers, everything - for 10 to 15 minutes. You do what neuroscientist call 'resetting your brain.' There are tons of activities that we know reset your brain. Taking a walk in nature, looking at clouds, looking at a picture book (not on your computer), exercising for a few minutes, laughing, talking to somebody, speaking a foreign language, playing a musical instrument. Our brain is at a constant, high-activation level and we need time to let it mellow, rest and reset, so then we can better process the information.

A lot of people use LinkedIn and Facebook for professional as well as social reasons, but you argue that the reliance or heavy use of these platforms can lead to problems. Why is that? First, let me say that I'm a fan of social media. I find it an amazingly powerful tool. Having said that, I think that the way social media is right now, it is promoting obsessive behaviors, it is promoting the constant need to check in. I am the worst at this. I am constantly checking in to see if there are comments on my site, because I want to jump on them. I am constantly checking in on Facebook, and one of the things that I have had to do is moderate this kind of behavior. Social media is intensely compelling.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness