Asus Transformer Pad Infinity TF700 review: stylish, high-performance Android tablet

With its latest update, Asus raises the bar for Android tablet performance and design.

By Melissa J. Perenson, PC World |  Consumerization of IT, Android, Asus

As soon as you turn on the Infinity, you'll notice a difference between this model and its older brethren. The Infinity is one of two high-resolution 1920-by-1200-pixel Android tablets aiming to compete with Apple's third-generation iPad Retina display; the other, the Acer Iconia Tab A700, is now shipping and just edged the Infinity across the finish line to market.

Like the iPad's Retina display, the Infinity's high-resolution, 10.1-inch display dramatically improves the overall tablet experience. Text is clearer, images are sharper, and everything on the screen pops. The Infinity's pixel density of 224 pixels per inch matches that of the Iconia Tab A700. The iPad's 2048-by-1536 pixel resolution delivers an even higher pixel density of 264 pixels per inch, but the difference in screen quality between the iPad and the two Android tablets was not overwhelmingly obvious. The difference was obvious, however, between the Infinity and the Prime, as illustrated by the two screenshots below.

Text quality seemed noticeably smoother on the iPad than on either high-resolution Android tablet, which is unsurprising considering the iPad's higher pixel density. However, the degree of superiority seemed to vary considerably depending on the font I was looking at, which leads me to wonder whether the observed difference may be less about the Android tablets' lower pixel density and more about inherent differences in the way Apple's iOS and Google's Android handle text rendering.

Our test images looked great on the Infinity, too. As expected, images generally looked sharper and clearer, and had better color reproduction than on such 1280-by-800-pixel tablets as the Asus Transformer Pad TF300, the Asus Transformer Prime, the Toshiba Excite 10.1, and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2. At maximum brightness, images viewed on the Prime looked more washed out than corresponding images on the Infinity--even though the Infinity's Super IPS+ display has the stronger maximum brightness measurement at 630 candelas per square meter to the Prime's 564 cd/m2.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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