7 days with a Windows 8 tablet: Not quite the best of both worlds

By , ITworld |  Consumerization of IT, I'll try it, Microsoft


Day 4 – Socially confused

Of course I played with Metro from day 1 but this is when I really jumped on the whole Windows 8 bandwagon: I went through all the apps available on the Windows Store and Microsoft's built-in apps, configured and used them day and night. Here's what I found in the most commonly used/popular apps:

Internet Explorer: Full-screen browsing works perfectly with the new Metro version of IE 10. It was fluid, I hit even the smallest textlinks and pinch-to-zoom worked as expected. What I hated was the fact that my favorites bar is completely gone (on the desktop side of things, I use the bar daily to get to my favorites.)

In the Metro environment, IE 10 does not sport any sorts of favorites. When opening a new tab, it allows you to browse through your recently used files or through your "pinned" sites. But "pinned" sites isn't what I want. You can't really organize those entries. It's the reason I use the desktop version of IE even when I'm on the sofa.

Awesome: Both Flash and HTML5 worked flawlessly on every site I tried it on.

People: I just don't like it. The "People" app combines all of my Exchange, LinkedIn, Google, Facebook and Live Messenger contacts into one big view. It gives me an aggregated view of everything that's been happening with my friends and colleagues. Maybe it's just the way I think and work but I hate this mumbo-jumbo of combined information. If I want to know what's going on with my Facebook contacts, I go to Facebook. If I'm interested in tweets, I go to Twitter. Curious what's happening on Live Messenger? Hey, I have no problem opening the little Live Messenger app on my desktop. Microsoft solved a problem that, in my opinion, didn't exist. The idea of having everything in one place sounds good, but the execution lacks a clear structure.

Calendar: An easy to manage calendar application, yet it looks like a Windows 3.1 app with its lack of proper calendar features and overall (very colorless) design.

Photos: The best app of them all. Aggregates local and remote (Facebook, SkyDrive, network drive) pictures into a beautiful view -- it's the same idea as the People app, but this one is well structured and easy to use.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Consumerization of ITWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question