Now you can own this crazy 13-foot robotic exoskeleton

Japanese engineers unveil the finished version of their 13-foot, five-ton robotic exoskeleton.

By Kevin Lee, PC World |  Consumerization of IT, robots

Remember that crazy 12-foot, five-ton robotic exoskeleton we showed you in May? Well now you buy one for a cool 1.3 million dollars.

Suidobashi Heavy Industry has just introduced the finished version of its heavy-duty robot dream machine at the Wonder Festival in Tokyo. Since we last saw Kuratas, its grown a foot taller and gotten hold of a ball-bearing Gatling gun that fires 6,000 pellets per second. Yowsa.

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Kuratas is modeled to be a human shaped tank with a head, two movable arms, and a four-wheel diesel engine platform that lets the bot go up to 6.2 miles per hour. You can control the mech by either climbing into the command chair and using joysticks or use a 3G smartphone as a remote control.

All this awesome comes direct from Suidobashi Heavy Industry with a roughly 100 million Yen price tag (that's around $1,353,500 at current exchange rates). Of course, you can add options to your mech with a custom paint job or your choice of weapons including a shield, claw, spike-driver, as well as some kind of water missile launcher. After all, if you're going to pay that much on a robot, what's another few hundred thousand dollars?

[Suidobashi Heavy Industry and Kogoro Kurata via The Guardian]

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Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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