iPhone 5: Why no wireless charging?

Hint: It's all about the specs

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, Apple, iPhone 5

Unlike those devices, the new iPhone 5 comes with a new connector called Lightning, which replaces the 30-pin socket used since the first iPhone was launched in 2003.

The Lightning connector is 80% smaller than the previous one, and it is reversible for convenience sake, but it also means users will now have to purchase a $29 adapter to plug into existing speaker docks and charging stations.

During Apple's press conference announcing the new Lightning connector, Phil Schiller, SVP of worldwide marketing for Apple, said the stripped down connector is in response to the many functions now being performed wirelessly.

"We use Bluetooth now to connect to speakers, and headphones and car systems. We use Wi-Fi to do AirPlay to our TV or stereo. We can do WiFi syncing to iTunes now," he said. "It's time for the connector to evolve."

"So now we have Thunderbolt and Lightning in our connector strategy," Schiller said. "This connector is a modern connector for the next decade."

Schiller said Apple is working with accessory partners such as Bose, JBL, Bowers & Wilkins (B&W), and Bang and Olufsen to bring Lightning-enabled products to market by the holiday season.

Lucas Mearian covers storage, disaster recovery and business continuity, financial services infrastructure and health care IT for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His e-mail address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

See more by Lucas Mearian on Computerworld.com.

Read more about smartphones in Computerworld's Smartphones Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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